The Scrap Album - Site Guide

Ephemera Events, News & Exhibitions


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  • Ephemera Society Fairs 2015

  • Sunday · 20 September
  • Doubletree by Hilton
  • 92 Southampton Row
  • London WC1B 4BH
  • United Kingdom
  • All are welcome.   Entry £2   11.00 - 16.00
  • Members from 10am with membership cards
  •  

  • Ephemera Society Special Fairs 2015

  • Sunday · 6 December
  • Holiday Inn London Bloomsbury
  • Coram Street
  • London WC1N 1HT
  • United Kingdom
  • All are welcome.   Entry £3   11.00 - 16.00
  • Members from 10am with membership cards

Website www.ephemera-society.org.uk/
Enquiries

 

 

  Image of Alice and the Queen

The Alice Look

Until 1 November 2015

2015 marks the 150th anniversary of the first publication of one of Britain’s best-known and most-loved children’s books, Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland. This exhibition examines how Alice has influenced style and fashion over the past 150 years.

The Alice Look will bring together garments, photographs, rare editions and illustrations to show Alice as both a follower of fashion and a trendsetter.

  • V&A Museum of Childhood
  • Cambridge Heath Road
  • London E2 9PA
  • UK
  • www.vam.ac.uk/moc/

 

 

A Kingdom of Images: French Prints in the Age of Louis XIV, 1660–1715

Until 6 September 2015 Image of Louis XIV, King of France and Navarre,1661

Under the longest reigning king in French history, Paris became the most important print producer in Europe, a position it maintained until the end of the 19th century.

This extraordinary development was fueled by official policies that aimed to elevate the entire spectrum of the fine and decorative arts. Prints were at once a means of communication, a propaganda tool, and an art form in ever-increasing demand.

Printmakers and print publishers produced hundreds of thousands of works on paper in a century that was as hungry for imagery as ours is today.

Propaganda was an essential characteristic of print production. But propaganda refers to more than images of the king’s likeness, victories, virtues, and royal festivals, which were most effectively disseminated through etchings and engravings. It also refers to a broader strategy promoted by the king himself: France would be a model for the rest of Europe.

With the help of prints, allies and enemies alike would bear witness to the unmatched refinement of French technical skill, aesthetics, and taste. On the tercentenary of the death of Louis XIV, this exhibition demonstrates the significance of an art that attained unparalleled sophistication and influence.

This exhibition was organized by the Getty Research Institute in special collaboration with the Bibliothèque nationale de France.

  • Getty Research Institute
  • The Getty Center
  • 1200 N Sepulveda Blvd
  • Los Angeles, CA 90049
  • USA
  • www.getty.edu/kingdom
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  • Illustration: Louis XIV, King of France and Navarre, Robert Nanteuil after Nicolas Mignard, 1661, (Detail).

 

 

 

Fashioning Philadelphia - The Style of the City,
1720-1940

Until 4 March 2016

Image of US trade card
Trade card for J E Caldwell & Co - Jewelers, Silversmiths and Importers, 902 Chestnut St, Philadelphia. Easter 1880. Printed by Marcus Ward & Co.

Home to modest Quakers, prosperous free blacks, well-heeled international transplants, and working classes of all sorts, Philadelphia was once the country's most cosmopolitan city.

In addition to being known for stylish residents, Philadelphia gained a reputation as a manufacturing powerhouse by the 19th century. Called the “Workshop of the World,” the city supported countless manufacturers producing goods used in the fashion industry. Tanneries, ironworks, and mills made the leather, metal, and cloth that a thriving community of shoemakers, tailors, and milliners fashioned into parasols, hoop skirts, shawls, and hats.

To tell this particular story, Fashioning Philadelphia draws on the Library Company's rich collections of historical materials. Among many other items, it includes several portraits of Benjamin Franklin ("Philadelphia's first fashionista"), hand-coloured fashion plates showing men and women wearing the latest styles, tailoring patterns, contemporary views of Chestnut Street, interior views of the Stetson hat factory, architectural renderings of major department stores, and small artifacts such as 19th-century sunglasses and ladies' boots.

By showing depictions of Philadelphians from all walks of life, from prosperous free African Americans to the labouring poor, gang members to Quakers, the exhibition also presents a social history of the city, and of urban America in general, as it changed over two centuries.

  • Library Company of Philadelphia
  • Houghton Library
  • Louise Lux-Sions and Harry Sions Gallery
  • 1314 Locust Street
  • Philadelphia, PA 19107
  • USA
  • www.librarycompany.org/

 

 

Alice in Cartoonland

Until 1 November 2015 Image of Alice

Alice, the White Rabbit, the Mad Hatter, the March Hare and the Cheshire Cat were introduced to the world by Lewis Carroll in 1865 in Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland. A sequel, Through the Looking-glass and What Alice Found introduced more memorable characters including the Jabberwock, Humpty Dumpty, the Walrus and the Carpenter and the Kings, Queens and Knights of the chessboard.

For 150 years the curious creatures from Carroll’s topsy-turvy world have been part of popular culture the world over, not just in books, plays and films, toys, games and millions of products from food to clothing but also in – cartoons!

This is hardly surprising since when Lewis Carroll (real name Charles Lutwidge Dodgson) was seeking an illustrator for Alice he chose John Tenniel, the leading cartoonist of his day, whose caricatures of Victorian politicians and celebrities appeared every week in the pages the humorous magazine, Punch.

Image of Mad hatter The Alice books are a true collaboration between Dodgson’s extraordinary imagination and Tenniel’s graphic wit: for example, the Hatter’s iconic top hat with it’s pre-decimal price label (‘In this Style, 10/6’) was just one of Tenniel’s many embellishments to Dodgson’s text.

Alice in Cartoonland celebrates Alice’s many misadventures at the hands of cartoonists, caricaturists and satirists, animators and graphic artists through 150 years of parodies and pastiches, jibes, jokes and gags aimed at making political points, social comment or just intended to make us laugh.

Artists represented range from Low, Vicky, Shepard and Illingworth to via Searle and ffolkes to Scarfe, Steadman and Rowson. There are Alice posters by Gilroy advertising Guinness, cartoon strips featuring Flook and Snoopy, pages from comics and graphic novels and original animation art from film and TV versions of Alice.

  • Cartoon Museum
  • 35 Little Russell Street
  • London
  • WC1A 2HH
  • UK
  • www.cartoonmuseum.org/exhibitions/
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  • Illustrations from Alice Versary: The Guinness Birthday Book, 1959.
    Illustrated by Ronald Ferns.

 

 

Spotlight – Freemasons and entertainment

Until 13 February 2016 Image of poster

During the 1700s, as Freemasonry grew in popularity, it began to attract new members from increasingly diverse social backgrounds. Masonic lodges had always attracted men whose work could take them anywhere in the country, such as mariners and merchants, who would find security and friendship within the fraternity. The stage was no different and throughout the 1700s, there are many examples of members of the theatrical or musical professions enjoying or seeking membership of lodges. The 1800s saw the development of “class lodges”, which were lodges for men with a common interest, background or occupation.

In 1863 Maybury Lodge No. 969 was formed for freemasons connected to the Royal Dramatic College in Woking, a home for retired actors. This was the first of many lodges associated with the theatrical profession that would open in the next 100 years.

This exhibition examines over twenty lodges associated with theatre, music and entertainment from lodges for Victorian pantomime stars in London’s Drury Lane to musical hall Bohemians in Birkenhead.

Throughout the exhibition you will also find items relating to many theatrical and musical “stars” of their time; ventriloquists, actor managers, the original Charley’s Aunt, music hall and vaudeville comedians, composers and conductors, a star of the silent screen and two rock music legends.

  • Freemasons’ Hall
  • 60 Great Queen Street
  • London WC2B 5AZ
  • UK
  • www.freemasonry.london.museum/category/events/

 


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