The Scrap Album - Site Guide

Ephemera Events, News & Exhibitions


Image of logo
  • Ephemera Society Fairs 2015

  • Sunday · 20 September
  • Doubletree by Hilton
  • 92 Southampton Row
  • London WC1B 4BH
  • United Kingdom
  • All are welcome.   Entry £2   11.00 - 16.00
  • Members from 10am with membership cards
  •  

  • Ephemera Society Special Fairs 2015

  • Sunday · 6 December
  • Holiday Inn London Bloomsbury
  • Coram Street
  • London WC1N 1HT
  • United Kingdom
  • All are welcome.   Entry £3   11.00 - 16.00
  • Members from 10am with membership cards

Website www.ephemera-society.org.uk/
Enquiries

 

 

  Image of Alice and the Queen

The Alice Look

Until 1 November 2015

2015 marks the 150th anniversary of the first publication of one of Britain’s best-known and most-loved children’s books, Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland. This exhibition examines how Alice has influenced style and fashion over the past 150 years.

The Alice Look will bring together garments, photographs, rare editions and illustrations to show Alice as both a follower of fashion and a trendsetter.

  • V&A Museum of Childhood
  • Cambridge Heath Road
  • London E2 9PA
  • UK
  • www.vam.ac.uk/moc/

 

 

A Kingdom of Images: French Prints in the Age of Louis XIV, 1660–1715

Until 6 September 2015 Image of Louis XIV, King of France and Navarre,1661

Under the longest reigning king in French history, Paris became the most important print producer in Europe, a position it maintained until the end of the 19th century.

This extraordinary development was fueled by official policies that aimed to elevate the entire spectrum of the fine and decorative arts. Prints were at once a means of communication, a propaganda tool, and an art form in ever-increasing demand.

Printmakers and print publishers produced hundreds of thousands of works on paper in a century that was as hungry for imagery as ours is today.

Propaganda was an essential characteristic of print production. But propaganda refers to more than images of the king’s likeness, victories, virtues, and royal festivals, which were most effectively disseminated through etchings and engravings. It also refers to a broader strategy promoted by the king himself: France would be a model for the rest of Europe.

With the help of prints, allies and enemies alike would bear witness to the unmatched refinement of French technical skill, aesthetics, and taste. On the tercentenary of the death of Louis XIV, this exhibition demonstrates the significance of an art that attained unparalleled sophistication and influence.

This exhibition was organized by the Getty Research Institute in special collaboration with the Bibliothèque nationale de France.

  • Getty Research Institute
  • The Getty Center
  • 1200 N Sepulveda Blvd
  • Los Angeles, CA 90049
  • USA
  • www.getty.edu/kingdom
  •  
  • Illustration: Louis XIV, King of France and Navarre, Robert Nanteuil after Nicolas Mignard, 1661, (Detail).

 

 

 

Such a curious dream! Alice’s Adventures in
Wonderland at 150

Until 5 September 2015 Illustration by John Tenniel

This exhibition will feature unique, colourful and curious Carrolliana from the early 1860s to the present. Drawn largely from the fabulous collection compiled by Harvard alumnus Harcourt Amory, the exhibition will include original drawings by illustrator John Tenniel, foreign editions of the book, parodies, theatrical works and ephemera. Not to be missed: Alice Liddell’s own copy of the suppressed first edition.

  • Edison and Newman Room
  • Houghton Library
  • Harvard Yard
  • Harvard University
  • Cambridge, MA 02138
  • USA
  • http://hcl.harvard.edu/info/exhibitions/

 

 

Alice in Cartoonland

Until 1 November 2015 Image of Alice

Alice, the White Rabbit, the Mad Hatter, the March Hare and the Cheshire Cat were introduced to the world by Lewis Carroll in 1865 in Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland. A sequel, Through the Looking-glass and What Alice Found introduced more memorable characters including the Jabberwock, Humpty Dumpty, the Walrus and the Carpenter and the Kings, Queens and Knights of the chessboard.

For 150 years the curious creatures from Carroll’s topsy-turvy world have been part of popular culture the world over, not just in books, plays and films, toys, games and millions of products from food to clothing but also in – cartoons!

This is hardly surprising since when Lewis Carroll (real name Charles Lutwidge Dodgson) was seeking an illustrator for Alice he chose John Tenniel, the leading cartoonist of his day, whose caricatures of Victorian politicians and celebrities appeared every week in the pages the humorous magazine, Punch.

Image of Mad hatter The Alice books are a true collaboration between Dodgson’s extraordinary imagination and Tenniel’s graphic wit: for example, the Hatter’s iconic top hat with it’s pre-decimal price label (‘In this Style, 10/6’) was just one of Tenniel’s many embellishments to Dodgson’s text.

Alice in Cartoonland celebrates Alice’s many misadventures at the hands of cartoonists, caricaturists and satirists, animators and graphic artists through 150 years of parodies and pastiches, jibes, jokes and gags aimed at making political points, social comment or just intended to make us laugh.

Artists represented range from Low, Vicky, Shepard and Illingworth to via Searle and ffolkes to Scarfe, Steadman and Rowson. There are Alice posters by Gilroy advertising Guinness, cartoon strips featuring Flook and Snoopy, pages from comics and graphic novels and original animation art from film and TV versions of Alice.

  • Cartoon Museum
  • 35 Little Russell Street
  • London
  • WC1A 2HH
  • UK
  • www.cartoonmuseum.org/exhibitions/
  •  
  • Illustrations from Alice Versary: The Guinness Birthday Book, 1959.
    Illustrated by Ronald Ferns.

 

 

Fans of the Belle Époque

Until 2 September 2015

This glorious exhibition evokes the extravagance and theatricality commonly associated with this alluring epoch (c. 1890-1910) and features a spellbinding assortment of exquisitely-crafted fans – the types favoured by wealthy American heiresses and the cream of European society at this time.

Image of fan

The very best of the Museum’s collections of late nineteenth and early twentieth century fans are on show, including: lavish examples from the go-to fan makers of the period, Duvelleroy & Kees; an array of beautifully conceived Art Nouveau confections, and exuberant designs by gifted painters such as Abbéma, Lasellaz, and Billotey.

  • The Fan Museum
  • 12 Crooms Hill
  • Greenwich
  • London SE10 8ER
  • UK
  • www.thefanmuseum.org.uk

 


Albums & Scraps
Saint Valentines Day
Easter & Fairyland
Christmas & New Year
Printed Ephemera
Publishers